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The WOC Skin Health Weekly®, a weekly e-news publication packed with career empowerment resources including the latest clinical, industry, and product news, clinical education, market research, and of course, the most recently posted jobs requiring expertise in the prevention and treatment of skin breakdown and wound care. Thousands of wound care clinicians now receive the WOC Skin Health Weekly.

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Featured Articles

June 3, 2019

Scientists Unmask Stem Cell Identity Using Gene-Sequencing Technology

Scientists from The University of Queensland's Diamantina Institute have revealed the difference between a stem cell and other blood vessel cells using gene-sequencing technology. Leading skin cancer and stem cell researcher Professor Kiarash Khosrotehrani said the findings provided evidence of how stem cells express genes that allow them to be identified within a blood vessel. UQDI Senior Lecturer Dr Jatin Patel performed the study and looked at every single cell in the largest artery, the aorta, and identified the genes expressed by each cell through sequencing.  Read More  

WOC Skin Health Weekly Launches Two New Surveys

We invite all clinicians to participate in our two newest market research studies; SAWC Spring 2019 Conference Feedback, and Wound Care Brand Awareness Study. These two surveys can be found in the Active Surveys section below. Thank you for your participation.   Take a Survey

Cellular Conflict Is Crucial to Development of Healthy Skin

Not all cells are destined for greatness. Deemed unfit to serve in the body, some are killed off during early development through a process called cell competition. This phenomenon has previously been documented in flies and is now turning out to occur in mammals as well. In a recent study, described in Nature, Rockefeller scientists showed that skin cells in mice engage in two forms of competition, one taking place during early embryonic development and the other occurring just before birth. The researchers believe that this cutthroat cellular conflict is crucial to the cultivation of healthy skin.  Read More

IU Researchers Develop Electroceutical Dressing to Disrupt Bacterial Biofilms 

Work conducted in the laboratories of the Indiana Center for Regenerative Medicine and Engineering, Chandan Sen, PhD and Sashwati Roy, PhD has led to the development of a dressing that uses an electric field to disrupt biofilm infection. Their findings were recently published in the high-impact journal "Annals of Surgery." Bacterial biofilms are thin, slimy films of bacteria that form on some wounds, including burns or post-surgical infections, as well as after a medical device, such as a catheter, is placed in the body. These bacteria generate their own electricity, using their own electric fields to communicate and form the biofilm, which makes them more hostile and difficult to treat.  Read More