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Featured Articles

March 29, 2019

DCBs Not Beneficial in Below-the-Knee Lesions  

Compared with plain balloons, drug-coated balloons did not improve patency and were associated with worse 12-month rates of amputation-free survival in patients with below-the-knee lesions, according to an investigator-initiated study presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting. The researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of 138 patients with critical limb ischemia (mean age, 63 years; 93 men; 94.2% with diabetes; 52.9% with end-stage renal failure) who had below-the-knee lesions treated with a DCB or a plain balloon. Read More

Wearable Sensors Mimic Skin to Help With Wound Healing Process

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York, have developed skin-inspired electronics to conform to the skin, allowing for long-term, high-performance, real-time wound monitoring in users. “We eventually hope that these sensors and engineering accomplishments can help advance healthcare applications and provide a better quantitative understanding in disease progression, wound care, general health, fitness monitoring and more,” said Matthew Brown, a PhD student at Binghamton University. Biosensors are analytical devices that combine a biological component with a physiochemical detector to observe and analyze a chemical substance and its reaction in the body.  Read More

Mechanism of Impaired Wound Healing in Diabetes Identified

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a mechanism that can explain the impaired wound healing in diabetes which can lead to diabetic foot ulcers. The study is published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In diabetic mice, wound healing improved when the identified signalling pathway was blocked. Diabetic foot ulcerations are a common complication of diabetes that constitute a major medical, social and economic issue. The lifetime risk of a person with type 1 or type 2 diabetes developing a foot ulcer is around fifteen percent. The treatment options are currently limited due to a poor understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms.   Read More

Wound-Healing Bacteria

It sounds counter intuitive to rub bacteria into a wound to make it heal faster, but a Swedish startup, called Ilya Pharma are doing just that, with astonishing results. A few years ago, during her PhD, Evelina Vågesjö discovered a family of immune signals made by white blood cells that lure other immune cells into wound sites where they can promote repair. But these signals are tricky to produce, and they act for only a very short time. Her solution was to add the gene used in the body to make the immune signal to bacteria like those you find in yogurt and apply the modified bacteria into the injury. Read More