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Featured Articles

March 15, 2019

Plasma Protein May Hold Potential for Making Wound-Healing Tissue Scaffolds

Researchers in Germany have employed a plasma protein found in blood to develop a new method for making wound-healing tissue scaffolds. The team's new scaffold can be attached or detached from a surface, for either in vitro laboratory tissue studies or direct applications in the body. Their discovery, reported today in the journal Biofabrication, could be extremely useful for future use in wound healing and tissue engineering. Lead author Professor Dorothea Brüggemann, from the University of Bremen, said: "The protein we used is called fibrinogen. It is an extracellular glycoprotein found in blood plasma and plays a major role in wound healing by assembling into a fibrous network to form a provisional extracellular matrix (ECM) that helps with wound closure." Read More

New Research Suggests Potential Role for Wild Blueberries in Promoting Wound Healing

New research, published in The Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, reveals that the unique phenolic acids found in wild blueberries speed up the migration of cells that line our blood vessels (endothelial cells). Cell migration (the moving of cells in order to begin forming new tissue) is an integral part of angiogenesis (the development of blood vessels to supply the newly forming tissue) and the wound healing process. Additionally, the research found that a combination of phenolic acids and anthocyanins in wild blueberries also promoted cell migration. These new findings have positive implications for wound healing and tissue repair, which are especially important for people with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and conditions associated with ischemia, such as strokes. Read More

Mobile Bedside Bioprinter Can Heal Wounds

Imagine a day when a bioprinter filled with a patient's own cells can be wheeled right to the bedside to treat large wounds or burns by printing skin, layer by layer, to begin the healing process. That day is not far off. Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have created such a mobile skin bioprinting system - the first of its kind - that allows bi-layered skin to be printed directly into a wound. "The unique aspect of this technology is the mobility of the system and the ability to provide on-site management of extensive wounds by scanning and measuring them in order to deposit the cells directly where they are needed to create skin," said Sean Murphy, Ph.D., a WFIRM assistant professor who was lead author of the paper published this month in Nature's Scientific Reports journal. Read More

New Device Could Help Minimize Scarring in Cosmetic Surgery

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new device that could help minimize scarring during surgery. The device can ascertain the orientation of skin tension lines, which is important for wound-healing post-surgery. Human skin is a complex tissue that exhibits properties that arise primarily from the alignment of collagen fibers in the dermis layer of the skin, ultimately causing skin tension lines. These lines are vital for surgery, as they are used to guide incisions that produce the least conspicuous scars. While there are many skin tension guidelines to help surgeons make incisions that create unnoticeable scars, skin anisotropy, or the skin's property of having directionally dependent mechanical properties, is believed to vary from subject to subject, with no single guideline universally recognized as the best to implement for surgical applications. Read More