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Featured Articles

March 1, 2019

Skin Wound Regeneration with Bioactive Glass-Gold Nanoparticles Ointment

Healing is a complex process in adult skin impairments, requiring collaborative biochemical processes for onsite repair. Diverse cell types (macrophages, leukocytes, mast cells) contribute to the associated phases of proliferation, migration, matrix synthesis and contraction, coupled with growth factors and matrix signals at the site of the wound. Understanding signal control and cellular activity at the site could help explain the process of adult skin repair beyond mere patching up and more as regeneration, to assess biomechanics and implement strategies for accelerated wound repair in regenerative medicine. Read More

DARPA to Apply Electronics in Advanced Wound Treatment

Technology continues to advance the concept that “medical miracles” can become mundane. Advancements in electronics, including biosensors, actuators, and artificial intelligence, can potentially speed the healing of burns, blast injuries, and other devastating wounds frequently suffered in combat. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) – which collaborated on inventions such as the internet—is seeking developers in AI and bioelectronics to assist in its Bioelectronics for Tissue Regeneration (BETR) program. Solutions will stimulate wound-healing processes in real time to optimize tissue repair and regeneration.  Read More

What Causes Post-Cesarean Wound Infections?

Cesarean delivery, which some people call a C-section, is a major surgery. It comes with the same risks, including wound infections, as other types of surgery. Infections occur when bacteria enter the wound. Staphylococcus aureus, or staph bacteria, are the most common cause of post-cesarean wound infections, causing an estimated 15–20 percent of cases. Staph bacteria naturally live on people's hair and skin. When they multiply and enter a wound, they can cause several types of infection. Staph can cause the following types of post-cesarean wound infection:  Read More

Risk Factors ID'd OR Site Infection After Orthopedic Surgery in Seniors

The researchers found that within one postoperative year, 74 patients developed SSIs. The overall incidence of SSI was 3.64 percent, with 0.4 percent for deep infection and 1.1 percent for superficial infection. The most common causative pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (53.2 percent) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (23.4 percent). Nearly half of S. aureus SSIs (12 of 25) were caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 3.7), morbid obesity (OR, 2.6), tobacco smoking (OR, 4.2), surgical duration >75th percentile (OR, 1.9), and albumin <35 g/L (OR, 2.3) were independently associated with SSI. Read More