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Featured Articles

December 5, 2018

Diacerein Ointment Could Be Safe Treatment for Generalized Severe EBS, Study Suggests

A 1% diacerein ointment could be a safe and well-tolerated way to treat generalized severe epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), according to a study involving two boys treated for four weeks. In vitro data suggested that the diacerein ointment was retained in the skin for a prolonged period of time. The study, “Basal pharmacokinetic parameters of topically applied diacerein in pediatric patients with generalized severe epidermolysis bullosa simplex,” was published in the Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. Read More

Wound-Healing Cell May Be Cancer Key

UCLA scientists have discovered a protein factor that helps a fibroblast cell’s ability to help in wound healing. Fibroblasts are cells found in connective tissues of the body. In response to a wound, they migrate toward and spread through molecular changes. Such proliferation is linked with the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. To understand how fibroblast cells migrate, the UCLA team used RNA sequencing, imaging, primary human cells isolated from skin, cancer cell lines and mouse modeling. Researchers found that proliferating cells adjacent to wounds express higher levels of cleavage and polyadenylation factors than fibroblasts in unwounded skin. Read More

Stimulating Fibroblasts Can Trigger Hair Growth in Wound Healing

Stimulating fibroblasts through the sonic hedgehog pathway can trigger hair growth not previously seen in wound healing. By stirring crosstalk among skin cells that form the roots of hair, researchers report they have regrown hair strands on damaged skin. The findings better explain why hair does not normally grow on wounded skin and may help in the search for better drugs to restore hair growth, say the study’s authors. Led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine the study examined the effect of distinct signalling pathways in damaged skin of laboratory mice. Experiments focused on cells called fibroblasts that secrete collagen, the structural protein most responsible for maintaining the shape and strength of skin and hair.  Read More

It's Not a Shock: Better Bandage Promotes Powerful Healing

A new device powered by energy harvested from the body’s natural motions accelerates wound healing by delivering gentle electric pulses to an injury site. A new, low-cost wound dressing developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could dramatically speed up healing in a surprising way. The method leverages energy generated from a patient's own body motions to apply gentle electrical pulses at the site of an injury. In rodent tests, the dressings reduced healing times to a mere three days compared to nearly two weeks for the normal healing process. "We were surprised to see such a fast recovery rate," says Xudong Wang, a professor of materials science and engineering at UW-Madison. "We suspected that the devices would produce some effect, but the magnitude was much more than we expected." Read More