Trends in the Treatment of Myocardial Infarctions

In a recent micro survey hosted by 3S Consulting Group and featured within the Critical Care Weekly Pulse™ digital publication, respondents were asked to report trends in the treatment of myocardial infarctions.

Approximately 84% of respondents treated a patient in the past 60 days who suffered a myocardial infarction.

There are two (2) types of Myocardial Infarctions:

  • STEMI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction)
  • NSTEMI (non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction)

Of those who treated a patient in the past 60 days with a myocardial infarction, 53% reported the type of myocardial infarction treated most often as STEMI, followed by NSTEMI (47%).

Shortness of breath” (25%) and “Chest pain, pressure, or tightness that extends from the chest to the neck, throat, jaw, shoulder and/or arm” (19%) were reported as the symptoms displayed most often by patients before suffering a myocardial infarction (results comparable for both STEMI and NSTEMI).

Trends in the Treatment of Myocardial Infarctions

Trends in the Treatment of Myocardial Infarctions

Although symptoms displayed by patients with STEMI and NSTEMI are very similar, initial therapies utilized to treat these patients differ. Upon initial arrival to the critical care unit, Pain relief (19%) followed by Thrombolytic medicines to dissolve a thrombus that is blocking blood flow in a coronary artery (17%) are the therapies utilized most often to treat patients who suffered a STEMI. Contrastingly, Anti-platelet medicines (28%) and Beta-blocking agents (19%) are used most often to treat patients who suffered a NSTEMI upon initial arrival to the critical care unit.

Trends in the Treatment of Myocardial Infarctions

The majority of respondents reported that ≤30% of patients develop cardiac arrest after suffering STEMI, while ≤10% develop cardiac arrest after suffering NSTEMI.

Regardless of the type of myocardial infarction (STEMI/NSTEMI), Electrocardiograms (41%) and Cardiac enzyme blood tests (39%) are used most frequently to monitor patients, post myocardial infarction.

Trends in the Treatment of Myocardial Infarctions

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