Trends in the Treatment of Stage II Heel Pressure Ulcers (n=104)

In a recent micro survey hosted by 3S Consulting Group and featured within the WOC Skin Health Weekly® digital publication, respondents were asked to report trends in the treatment of Stage II Heel Pressure Ulcers.

“Stage II Heel Pressure Ulcers” defined as partial thickness loss of dermis presenting as a shallow, open ulcer with a red/pink wound bed, without slough; may also present as an intact or open/ruptured serum-filled blister.*

Approximately 88% of respondents reported that they routinely treat Stage II Heel Pressure Ulcers.

Of those that do, 62% described their clinical certification as Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse. The average years of experience in treating Stage II Heel Pressure Ulcers ranges between 5-15 years. The Hospital (57%) is the clinical setting in which Stage II Heel Pressure Ulcers are treated most often, followed by Long Term Care (16%).

The majority of respondents (57%) agreed that debridement is not indicated for Stage II Heel Pressure Ulcers. When debridement is indicated, Autolytic (18%) and Enzymatic (18%) is selected most often.

Those who selected Autolytic debridement reported the reason for selection as “Small amount of necrosis/slough” (35%), “Minimal disturbance to the wound and Peri-wound tissue” (24%), and “Minimal trauma to healthy tissue” (18%) most often.

Those who selected Enzymatic debridement reported the reason for selection as “Small amount of necrosis/slough” (29%), “Minimal disturbance to the wound and Peri-wound tissue” (24%), and “Minimal trauma to healthy tissue” (24%) most often.

Foams (excluding silver containing foams) (24%) are utilized most often as the primary wound dressing for the management of Stage II Heel Pressure Ulcers, followed by Hydrocolloids (17%), and Silicone dressings (11%).

“Primary” is defined as the dressing which is applied directly to the wound bed.

Those who selected Foams (excluding silver containing foams) as the primary dressing, reported the reason for selection as “Accelerate healing” (18%), “Alleviate pressure” (18%),  “Amount of exudate absorbed” (14%), and “Positive patient outcomes” (14%) most often.

Please contact your 3S Account Executive if you are interested in more in-depth research on Trends in the Treatment of Heel Pressure Ulcers.

*-National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel